Tag Archives: david platt

Beware: The Gospel Will Ruin Your Life

David Platt recently spoke at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.  Beware, if you listen to this message you will likely experience the “holy destruction” that the Spirit of God can bring.  Be prepared for conviction.

Platt presents a clear and compelling message of “What the Gospel Does to Our Hearts.”  The truth of the matter, the gospel, when rightly understood, will ruin your worldly way of life.

Are you ready to have your life ruined?

Here are a few memorable quotes.  Please watch or listen to the entire thing.

Until the gospel invades our hearts, any efforts to help the poor will be shallow and short-lived; but when the gospel of a Savior who became poor that we might become rich radically invades our hearts, it will radically affect the way we live for the sake of His glory amidst urgent spiritual and physical needs around the world.

The gospel demands radical sacrifice.

Hate your mom and dad, wife and kids; pick up an instrument of torture and give up everything you have.  That’s a lot different than admit, believe, confess, and pray a prayer.

Could it be that somewhere along the way we have taken the gospel, the very lifeblood of Christianity out, and put Kool-Aid in its place.  What it means to follow Jesus is to give up everything you’ve got.

Jesus is not a good teacher to be respected; He is a sovereign Lord to be obeyed.

‘That Jesus did not command all His followers to sell all their possessions gives comfort only to the kind of people to whom He would issue that command.’

If we take Jesus and twist Him into our image, then even when we gather together in our churches and lift our hands to sing songs to Jesus… we are not worshiping the Jesus of the Bible — we are worshiping ourselves.

The gospel, not guilt, is motivation for giving to those who are in need.

‘God always gives what He commands.’

We have found someone worth losing everything for… Do we believe [Christ] is worth it.

Materialism is not just wrong — it’s dumb.

The cost of discipleship is great… but the cost of non-discipleship is far, far greater.  It will cost us to give our resources, money, possessions, and lives in this world.  But what if we don’t?  The cost will be great for a billion plus people who will go on without  knowledge of the gospel while we spend our millions on our buildings, and our programs, and our stuff.  The cost will be great for our brothers and sisters in the world who will continue starving while our dogs and cats eat better than them.  But the cost will not just be great for them, the cost will be great for us.  For we will miss out… in this age and the life to come.