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Gungor Interview and CD Giveaway #freestuff #GungorGiveaway

Gungor has been kind enough to supply me with a few copies of their newest release Beautiful Things to give away on this blog.  There are several ways to enter the contest (one entry per method – comment, subscribe, or tweet – can be entered).  To enter the giveaway you may  1) leave a comment on this blog with a valid e-mail address, (2) subscribe to this blog via the e-mail subscription button in the column on the right, or (3) include #GungorGiveaway in a“tweet.”  The winners will be announced on this blog and will be contacted on June 14.

The album Beautiful Things by the more t-shirt friendly glossed “Gungor” (formerly “The Michael Gungor Band”) has been a genuine bright spot in the often trite and contrived “Christian” music market (notice I didn’t say “genre” as there are only Christian topics/lyrics and not Christian music/melodies).

One of the things I find fascinating about the album Beautiful Things is the range of musical style; this album is an eclectic mix.  Classically inspired guitar solos morph into genuine Hard Rock anthems (“Dry Bones”).   “Heaven” is introduced by a funk-styled bass run mixed with the gospel vocals.  “Brighter Day” will convince you that you picked up a vintage Switchfoot album.  Some tracks hint of Iron and Wine’s folk style (“Please Be My Strength”) or the experimentation of Arcade Fire (“We Will Run”) while others feel more like “church songs.”  All of them, however, come across with honest artistry.  The title track most clearly evidences the poetry, ability, and breadth of style that Gungor possesses.  This album provides opportunities to shout and to weep, to sing and to be silent, to dance and to meditate.  Gungor manifests genuine artistic freedom to make beautiful music that stands on its own without feeling an obligation to cater to a particular style, genre, or audience.

I recently spoke to Michael Gungor about music, art, Christianity, and community.  He felt it important to play honest, creative, and organic music.

Sometimes part of our downfall in Christian is that the message becomes of such central importance (which of course the message is important) that the music becomes secondary to the point where it almost becomes propaganda, something to carry a message.  I think there’s something sacred about art itself.

Throughout the album you hear an honest description of the Band’s journey.  Beautiful Things could be described as a “journal entry from [Gungor’s] first two years living in Denver.”  The song “We Will Run to You” was written for their faith community (Bloom Church) in Denver as they were struggling to express the need for repentance.  As you listen to Michael Gungor, you hear the growth and change that has come with the move to Denver and the organic creation of a new church.

When asked how such deeply Scriptural pleadings with God can be used to reach out to non-Christians, Gungor explains how honest art and the human need to worship God come together.

[Our music is] definitely church music and most of it is written to God.  There is something about [a song written to God] that unbelievers are drawn to, when it is done in a pure and honest way, when it is not manipulative.

As a Christian, when I hear Gungor I hear “praise” music as it should be:  honest, artistic, Scriptural, and confessional.  Within this CD you can marvel at the beauty of the creative process and, in turn, the beauty of the creator.

Gungor has been kind enough to supply me with a few copies of their newest release Beautiful Things to give away on this blog. There are several ways to enter the contest (one entry per method – comment, subscribe, or tweet – can be entered).  To enter the giveaway you may  1) leave a comment on this blog with a valid e-mail address, (2) subscribe to this blog via the e-mail subscription button in the column on the right, or (3) include #GungorGiveaway in a“tweet.”  The winners will be announced on this blog and will be contacted on June 14.

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The Meaning of the Pentateuch — Review and Giveaway

Christianity Today recently chronicled the Mark Driscoll/John Piper war-of-words regarding John Sailhamer’s newest book.  To recap, here was the online verbal exchange:

Driscoll noted that he received Sailhamer’s newest work, The Meaning of the Pentateuch, a book he felt was appropriate for “hardcore uber geek theological types who love footnotes.”

John Piper responded with an appropriate verbal beat down:

To all pastors and serious readers of the Old Testament — geek, uber geek, under geek, no geek — if you graduated from high school and know the word meaning, sell your latest Piper or Driscoll book and buy Sailhamer… There is nothing like it.  It will rock your world.  You will never read the Pentateuch the same again.  It is totally readable.  You can skip all the footnotes and not miss a beat.

In fact, you might have to skip the footnotes unless your German, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and French are up to par!

A Little Background

I was first introduced to John Sailhamer and his writings when I came to SEBTS in 2006.  After enduring four years of study at my undergraduate institution’s Religion department I was worn out from defending the historicity of the Hebrew Bible.  Reading Pentateuch as Narrative and Introduction to Old Testament Theology: A Canonical Approach was a breath of fresh air.  This hermeneutic took the text of Scripture seriously and made sense of of the New Testament writers’ interpretation of the Hebrew Bible.  These books provided a necessary corrective to my hermeneutic.  I had been so preoccupied by secondary textual issues in my reading of the Old Testament I had neglected to let the Old Testament shape my questions and concerns when I approached the text.  After listening to Sailhamer and re-reading the Hebrew Bible, I no longer felt self-conscious about the intentionality and cohesion of the Old Testament.  Further, from a scholarly perspective, I was made aware of the shortcomings of previous historical-critical approaches to the Hebrew Bible.  The method I was taught in my undergraduate studies (e.g., Wellhausen) had been demonstrated by modern scholarship to hold little prospect for consensus.  The meaning of the Hebrew Bible was opened as I saw new perspectives in reading the text as intended by its author(s) (e.g., Childs, Sailhamer, Rendtorff).

The Meaning of the Pentateuch

Sailhamer’s most recent contribution to Old Testament Studies is a legitimate tome in the field.  It is the magnum opus of his great career.  This text combines years of classroom teaching, scholarly research, and published books and articles into one collection.  The result is a comprehensive approach to the Pentateuch explaining and incorporating a robust Biblical Theology and well-defined Hermeneutic into serious, careful exegetical examination of the Hebrew Bible.  The reader will gain large overviews of subjects such as Biblical exegesis, Biblical theology, historical method, and philology.

What I most enjoy about this book is Dr. Sailhamer not only makes summary hermeneutical/theological/philosophical statements but he also demonstrates how he arrived to these conclusions.  Further, he demonstrates an exhaustive knowledge of the history of ideas in relation to Biblical exegesis and theology.  As a historian, Sailhamer is able to trace the historiography of Old Testament interpretation and explain how modern evangelicals have arrived at their current hermeneutical guidelines.

Exegesis

Sailhamer takes seriously the compositional strategy and the words of the text of the Hebrew Bible.  For Sailhamer, proper interpretation seeks to find the intended meaning of the author by the words he uses and the way the text is structured.  As a result he spends a significant amount of time exegeting the theological commentary that occurs at the seams of the Tanak (e.g., Deuteronomy 34, Joshua 1, Malachi 3/4, Psalms 1-2, Chronicles 36).  For him, these “seams” provide significant interpretive clues to the intended meaning of the Hebrew Bible.  Within the Hebrew Bible (and, even, the New Testament), Biblical authors act as Biblical theologians as they interpret previous text (e.g., compositional themes, prophets, apostles, etc.).

Organization of the Book

The book is organized into three sections dealing with foundational issues (e.g, hermeneutics, Biblical theology), text specific issues (e.g., compositional strategy), and theological conclusions drawn from a reading of the Pentateuch (e.g., covenant, blessing, messiah, Mosaic Law, salvation).

Concluding Remarks

Much more can be said about Sailhamer’s discussion of theology and compositional strategy.  Hopefully what has been discussed will whet your appetite to read this book and (more importantly) to examine the intended meaning of the Pentateuch.

Giveaway

In order to increase the traffic at my new blog and be generous, I have decided to give a brand new copy of John H. Sailhamer’s The Meaning of the PentateuchTo enter this giveaway merely comment on this post (make sure to use a valid e-mail address so I can contact you if you win). The winner will be chosen randomly and contacted via e-mail.  Please share this contest with other people via Twitter, Facebook, blog, or neighborhood flyers. Only one comment per person, but you’ll get an extra entry if you link to this post on your own blog!